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Trip Preparation

Q: En lieu of the Covid-19, what steps will you perform to propect me on my tour?

A:  In addition to our standard health guidlines, we offer each guest a small personal travel kit containing tissues, hand sanitizer, wipes, latex gloves, sunscreen and chamois butter.  All served foods are individual serving packs and disposible items. Dining options will include social distancing according to local suggestions, this may include separate dining options or group gatherings. Our interior van surfaces will be sanitized daily as will rental bikes, helmets, all luggage and objects touched by multiple invididuals. Riding will be with distancing and suggested only with those people with whom you live.

Most importantly, If it is not safe to travel to an area, we will postpone or make other options available.

Q:  What type of clothing and other items should I pack for my tour?

A: Your clothing choices will be determined by (1) Our tour destination, (2) Your needs for personal comfort, (3) Our space limitations. Don’t ove pack. Most everything can be carried in a medium size duffle. Our trips are your casual vacation. Our support van is available to transport your clothing and personal belongings. On certain days, we may be without access to the van, therefore be ready to carry your daypack with clothing and other personal articles.

Water is vital, and your daypack or backpack should be large enough to accommodate 2 water bottles.  Other options are a fanny pack water bottle carrier or a camelback style pack.

CLOTHING RECOMMENDATIONS

*Your BIKE or our rental bike

*Your PEDALS

*Your SADDLE

* Your HELMET

Bike shorts (2-3)

Jerseys (2-3)

Cycling shoes

Rain gear

Leisure clothing, including comfortable shoes for evenings (informal, casual and comfortable is the rule - evenings can be cool to cold)

Swimsuit

Multi purpose shoes and socks

Shorts

Short sleeve T-shirts

Long sleeve T-shirts (evenings and cool mornings, even for Southwest programs)

Gloves, long and short

Fleece or sweater

Jacket (e.g., fleece), sweater or sweatshirt (for warmth)

Leg tights, warm-up pants

Hat or other head covering (for sun protection)

Bandanas

(2) Water bottles

Tevas, aqua socks or old sneakers (for those programs where we will be wading through water, rafting, canoeing, etc.)

 

PERSONAL ARTICLES, OTHER GEAR

Cell phone and charger

Daypack

Water container carrier (your bike bottles will work fine)

Sun glasses

Sunscreen (spf 15 or greater) and lip protection

Camera and binoculars

 

  • Q: How should I condition for my tour?

    A:  At Cycle of Life Adventures (COLA), we are not going to prescribe some rigorous regimen of physical conditioning in preparation for your upcoming bicycle tour. We want to offer a few suggestions to further increase your anticipation of your tour.

     

    • Not every person may be “hooked” by the thrill of cycle touring. With the decision to ride with COLA, be aware you are accepting the fact you and your bicycle are going to do some climbing. It is best to prepare yourself for the type of cycling you will be doing on your tour.

    • For those of you who have cycled in the Northeast, Vermont, for example, or in upstate New York, in the Middle Atlantic regions of Pennsylvania, Virginia, Maryland or in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina -  you’ve experienced terrain more difficult than which you will encounter in the West.

    • Western climbs are longer than those generally found elsewhere in the country and you will reach altitudes higher than those with which you may be familiar.  The grades along most of our mountain passes rarely exceed 6% but, occasionally could reach 8% in short stretches. Every tour has its share of hills to climb - climbs that will maintain your attention for extended periods of time on occasion.

    • COLA believes the best means of preparing for any bicycle tour is to ride your bicycle. Then, ride some more.  Running, swimming and any other form of aerobic exercise is helpful, but is not a substitute for spending time in the saddle.

    • COLA’s daily mileages vary for each tour. Our average is between 40-70 miles/day on our moderate tours to 50-80 miles/day on our more difficult adventures.

    • COLA suggests you progressively spend more time in the saddle, gradually increase the distance of your rides each week  .Gear down as the terrain and wind dictate, to maintain a pace without tiring yourself. You’ll be amazed at the distance you can pleasurably cover and enjoy.

    • Practice on hills, which are different than flatland cruising. If you have some hills that are reasonably accessible, go for them as often as possible. If not, ride what you have and we’ll give you some “on-the-ride” training when you arrive.

    • We believe the most important preparation one can do for mountain cycling is psychological, rather than physical.  We are not suggesting the ride does not involve physical effort. However, preparing yourself mentally for the experience is equally as important as the physical training.

    • You are not in a race to the summit - you’re striving to achieve pride, not a prize. Your comfortable pace and enjoyment of your surroundings and the ride itself is paramount. Therefore, we suggest you gear down as far as is necessary to ensure your comfort. Whether it’s a 100-foot, 700-foot or a 5200-foot climb, the mindset is the same.  We have nothing but time. Remember… this is your vacation!

    • Eventually, you’ll develop your own technique for climbing. The more you do it, the less intimidating the climbs will appear. You’ll soon realize how readily you accept and even eagerly anticipate a climb to a mountain summit as the highlight of the day’s ride.

    • You’ll find you may be affected to some degree by the altitude. You may feel winded earlier than you’re used to in your daily rides. Please, don’t worry excessively about it. You’ll find that although you may not adjust fully to the increased elevation, you will be pleasantly surprised at how rapidly you will feel comfortable in spite of the changes you experience. Drinking plenty of fluids (more than you’re accustomed to) is essential for overcoming any discomfort the altitude may cause you.

      Suggested training for a multi-week Epic cycling tour

      Need to plan and start training 3-4 months from the beginning of the trip

      -          4 Months out

      Get fitted to the bike you are going to use from a local bike shop.

      If you haven’t ridden much, start by riding 2-3 times/week, with distances in the 20-30 mile range.

      -          3 Months out

      Ride 2-3 days/week, with at least one ride in the 40-50 mile range. Vary the terrain and distances. Use of intervals helps in strength and stamina building.

      Try to use saddle, shoes, and pedals you plan to use on trip.

      -          2 months out

      Increase riding days to 3-4 and mileage to at least one 50+ mile day. I like to begin hill repeats at this point.

      -          1 month out

      Ride 4-5 days/week. Try to ride 3 days in a row. Average miles in the 40-50 mile range with one being 70 miles.

      -          2 Weeks out

      Ride back to back 75 mile days.

      Get bike tuned up. New tires(get the widest possible for your rims and bike), chain and cassette. Check brakes and all cables.

      -          Week before

      Ride 60-70 miles on Sun, day off, an easy ride 25-30 miles on Tues.

      Pack up bike. Travel to starting location, have bike reassembled. Easy 15-20 mile ride to make sure bike fits properly and to loosen up legs.

      -          Seat time on the saddle you will be using is IMPORTANT!

      -          Spinning/indoor cycling classes are good, but they only last an hour. Get additional longer rides on your own bicycle.